Imee Marcos impatient over Nora Aunor and Dolphy not named as national artists

During the meet-the-press event,  Imee Marcosopenly said she would support a campaign to have Nora Aunor proclaimed as National Artist, same with the late Comedy King Dolphy.

According to her, Aunor should have been proclaimed a National Artist but she understands that there is a process a candidate has to go through. She said she is biased when it comes to Nora because she was the star of Himalathat she produced when she was head of the Experimental Cinema of the Philippines (ECP) that gave rise to a new wave of Philippine films paving the way for bolder and maverick filmmaking in the llater years of the Marcos regime.

Imee Marcos wonders why Nora Aunor and Dolphy are not named National Artists yet

Imee Marcos wonders why Nora Aunor and Dolphy are not named National Artists yet

Buwisit. Nabubuwisit ako na wala pa si AteGuy. Nabubuwisit lalo ako na hindi pa rin si Dolphy. It’s long overdue, nakakapikon na. I meant to say, ano ba ang dahilan? What’s the problem? I don’t get it. I think they are really overdue and it’s about time,” she ended.

Imee has loved the film industry since the time she was given the baton to wave and produce

films as director general of the ECP in 1982, films like Peque Gallaga’s “Oro Plata Mata,” Ishmael Bernal’s Himala,Pio De Castro 3rd’s Soltero, Uro de la Cruz’Misteryo SaTuwa, and Celso Ad Castillo’Isla.

With her passion for Filipino movies, it is no wonder she would still produce film until recently. In 2010, Marcos brought Donor to the big screen, starring Meryl Sorianoand Baron Geisler; then Pinta Kasi, starring JM de Guzmanand Erich Gonzales, which won Best Picture in the independent category of the 2011 Metro Manila Film Festival.

And she authored the bill that created the Film Development Council of the Philippines (FDCP).

 “I actually started my political career when I became the national chairman of Kabataang Barangay (now Sangguniang Kabataan). That time, the way to communicate with the youth was through TV or movies — not by speeches, meetings or fora because no one will give you attention,” Marcos explained to the entertainment press.

“So I entered Kulit Bulilitand Kaluskos Musmos. That’s where Herbert Bautistaand Maricel Sorianostarted. Joey de Leonalso wrote scripts there. That’s why through those shows, I was able to get closer to the young people, and I became more interested to showbiz that time too,” she shared.

According to Marcos, it was during their era when the Philippines was the second largest filmmaker in the world next to India, producing 140 movies in a year. She hopes Filipinos can do this again this time.

“If we play this right, I really believe that this could be another golden age [of Philippine cinema]. We can really embark on another Golden Age of Filipino Films because there’s so much talent today, it’s so easy to produce, and I’ve always maintained that Filipinos have stories to tell the world,” Marcos said.

Imee will run for the Senate in next year’s elections while brother Bongbong awaits the result of his electoral protest vs. Robredo and mother Imelda Marcos runs for governor of Ilocos Norte

Imee will run for the Senate in next year’s elections while brother Bongbong awaits the result of his electoral protest vs. Robredo and mother Imelda Marcos runs for governor of Ilocos Norte

Marcos then reminded that it was du­ring their era when the government established the Optical Media Board (OMB) and the Movie and Television Review and Classification Board (MTRCB). She pointed out that now is the best time to make the needed change especially that they are still using the laws they have made.

“We see that our laws for the creative industry are very old. Until now, MTRCB is regulating the Presidential Decree 1985. I was the one who started the amendments of OMB. And we are the ones who made the laws of the Film Development Council of the Philippines (FDCP) in 2002 when I was a congresswoman. All of those laws are still the same. They need to be changed considering the development of our industry,” she explained.

“If I will be able to have a national post, what I have to do is to help the Philippine cinema. My father believed in the power of films, while my mother always say that Filipinos are natural-born artists,” she mentioned, also hinting of a senatorial run in the 2019 elections.

“In the ‘70s and ‘80s, the only problem was the production; there were lots of issues also because we had lesser equipment. But now, the issue is the distribution. There are a lot of films these days — from indie, to mainstream, to regional — but it’s not being shown to the public because our distribution network is just for the studio films,” she continued.